The Latest: Klobuchar dismisses reports she's a tough boss

Snow falls as rally goers arrive at Boom Island Park for Democratic Sen. Amy Klobuchar's announcement of her decision in the race for president at a rally Sunday, Feb. 10, 2019, at Boom Island Park in Minneapolis. (AP Photo/Jim Mone)
Snow continues to fall as a worker clears snow off a runner and media members arrange equipment on a riser prior to Democratic Sen. Amy Klobuchar's announcement of her decision in the race for president at a rally Sunday, Feb. 10, 2019, at Boom Island Park in Minneapolis. (AP Photo/Jim Mone)
Senate Judiciary Committee member Sen. Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn., prepares to vote against advancing William Barr's nomination for attorney general, as the panel meets on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, Feb. 7, 2019. "This is not the time to install an attorney general who has repeatedly espoused a view of unfettered executive power." Klobuchar said Thursday. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
FILE - In this Jan. 15, 2109 file photo, Senate Judiciary Committee member Sen. Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn., during a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

MINNEAPOLIS — The Latest on Sen. Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn. (all times local):

4:40 p.m.

Sen. Amy Klobuchar is dismissing reports that she is difficult to work for, saying she has high expectations for the people who work for her.

Klobuchar was asked Sunday about the reports of high staff turnover and the loss of potential staff for the presidential campaign she announced in Minneapolis.

Klobuchar says "I can be tough" and that "I can push people" and that she has staff who have worked for her for years and gone on to do other things. She says she also has high expectations for the country.

A survey of senators by the website LegiStorm from 2001 to 2016 found that Klobuchar's office had the highest turnover in the Senate. A recent HuffPost article portrayed her as a demanding manager who lost some potential 2020 campaign staff members because of her reputation.

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3 p.m.

Democratic Sen. Amy Klobuchar says if elected president she will seek to immediately address the problem of climate change.

She tells a Minneapolis crowd that on Day One of her administration, the U.S. would rejoin the Paris climate accord, the landmark agreement on curbing global warming. President Donald Trump pulled the U.S. out of the accord in 2017, describing it as too costly for American businesses and taxpayers.

Klobuchar also says in her first 100 days as president she would reinstate clean power rules and gas mileage standards. And, she's pledging to put forth "sweeping legislation" to invest in green jobs and infrastructure.

Klobuchar announced Sunday she was running for president in 2020.

She says the people and science "are on our side" when it comes to addressing climate change.

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2:45 p.m.

Democratic Sen. Amy Klobuchar is pledging to "lead from the heart" and look out for the interests of everyday Americans if she's elected president.

She tells a crowd in snowy Minneapolis that leaders in Washington "for too long" have "sat on the sidelines" rather than address tough problems such as income inequality and climate change.

Klobuchar is pledging to represent "every worker, farmer, dreamer, and builder" and fight the "insidious forces every day that are trying to make it harder for people to vote, trying to drown out our voices with big money."

She says, "today we say enough is enough."

Klobuchar announced Sunday she was running to be president in 2020. She is the most prominent Midwesterner in the race so far.

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2:40 p.m.

Add one more name to the growing list of Democrats who want to be president in 2020. Amy Klobuchar (KLOH'-buh-shar), a three-term senator from Minnesota, made the announcement Sunday in Minneapolis. She's the most prominent Midwesterner in the race so far. Her party is trying to win back voters in a region that help put Donald Trump in the White House in 2016.

Klobuchar has drawn support from voters in urban, suburban and rural areas, including in dozens of counties Trump won in 2016.

She has said that success could translate to other Midwestern states such as Michigan and Wisconsin, reliably Democratic in presidential races for decades until Trump's victory over Hillary Clinton.

The list of Democrats already in the race features several better-known senators with the ability to raise huge amounts of money. They include Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts, Kamala Harris of California, Cory Booker of New Jersey and Kirsten Gillibrand of New York.

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1:30 p.m.

It's a festive atmosphere on a cold and snowy day in Minneapolis as an exuberant crowd has gathered at a park along the Mississippi River waterfront for what's expected to be Sen. Amy Klobuchar's announcement that she's running for president.

The Minnesota Democrat plans to address a growing crowd at Boom Island Park, with the city's skyline in the background, for her campaign kickoff Sunday afternoon.

The temperature is in the teens and many in the crowd look as though they're dressed for skiing. Campaign volunteers are passing out hand warmers along with American flags.

Klobuchar supporters are gathered around heat lamps and bonfires as they wait for the senator to speak. The campaign has provided cookies and 100 gallons each of hot chocolate and apple cider.

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8:35 a.m.

Democratic Sen. Amy Klobuchar (KLOH'-buh-shar) of Minnesota is set to join the 2020 presidential race later Sunday.

She would become the most prominent Midwestern candidate as her party tries to win back voters in a region that helped put Donald Trump in the White House.

The three-term senator is set to discuss her plans at an afternoon event in Minneapolis.

In remarks released before that event, she says: "'I'm asking you to join us on this campaign." She's citing the need to "heal the heart of our democracy and renew our commitment to the common good."

Klobuchar is pointing to her record of working with Republicans, and says the country is tired of what she calls "the shutdowns and the putdowns, the gridlock and the grandstanding."

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6:10 a.m.

Democrats are trying to win back voters in the Midwest, a region that helped put Donald Trump in the White House, and Minnesota Sen. Amy Klobuchar (KLOH'-buh-shar) is portraying herself as someone who can do just that.

She' set to join the 2020 presidential race on Sunday, becoming the most prominent Midwestern candidate.

Klobuchar has cited her broad appeal across Minnesota as she has discussed a potential campaign. She has drawn support from voters in urban, suburban and rural areas, including in dozens of counties Trump won in 2016.

She has said that success could translate to other Midwestern states such as Michigan and Wisconsin, reliably Democratic in presidential races for decades until Trump's victory over Hillary Clinton.

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