The Latest: Cyber expert's attorney say FBI deceived him

FILE - This May 15, 2017, file photo shows British cybersecurity expert Marcus Hutchins during an interview in Ilfracombe, England. Hutchins, accused of creating and distributing malware designed to steal banking passwords, is headed to court Wednesday, May 16, 2018, in Milwaukee for a hearing on what evidence may be used in the case. Federal prosecutors in Milwaukee say Hutchins acknowledged in recorded jailhouse phone calls that code he wrote wound up in malware, and they want to introduce that evidence. (AP Photo/Frank Augstein, File)

MILWAUKEE — The Latest on the case of British cybersecurity expert accused of creating software to steal banking passwords (all times local):

7:15 p.m.

Lawyers for a British cybersecurity expert credited with stopping the worldwide WannaCry computer virus say federal agents used deception when they interrogated him about criminal charges he faces for allegedly creating malware.

Attorneys for Marcus Hutchins made the argument Wednesday in Milwaukee federal court to try to convince a judge to suppress statements Hutchins made after his arrest last year. Prosecutors allege Hutchins created and distributed malware known as Kronos that was designed to steal banking passwords.

Hutchins has pleaded not guilty.

One of Hutchins' attorneys, Brian Klein, says FBI agents who interrogated Hutchins when they detained him in Las Vegas didn't tell him what he was accused of until an hour into their interview. But prosecutors say Hutchins understood what was happening and spoke voluntarily to the agents.

A ruling on the motion to suppress is expected in a couple of weeks.

___

9:50 a.m.

A British cybersecurity expert accused of creating and distributing malware designed to steal banking passwords is headed to court for a hearing on what evidence may be used in the case.

Marcus Hutchins was credited with stopping the worldwide WannaCry computer virus before he wound up being charged in the malware case.

Federal prosecutors in Milwaukee say Hutchins acknowledged in recorded jailhouse phone calls that code he wrote wound up in malware, and they want to introduce that evidence. Attorneys will argue the matter Wednesday.

Robert Graham, a computer security expert not connected to the case, warned against concluding that Hutchins did something wrong simply because his code wound up in malware.

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