Firm to reapply for permits to build northeast gas pipeline

In this June 3, 2019 photo the New York City skyline is in the background of the Raritan Bay as seen from Middletown, N.J. New Jersey environmental officials are due to decide Wednesday, June 5 on key permits for a nearly $1 billion pipeline that would bring natural gas from Pennsylvania through New Jersey, out into Raritan Bay and into the ocean before reaching New York and Long Island. (AP Photo/Wayne Parry)

MIDDLETOWN, N.J. — An Oklahoma company says it will reapply to build a hotly contested pipeline that would carry natural gas from Pennsylvania through New Jersey, and under a bay and the ocean to New York.

Tulsa-based Williams Companies says it will reapply for key environmental permits that were rejected Wednesday night by New Jersey regulators.

The New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection rejected the permits without prejudice, meaning the company can reapply.

On Thursday morning, the company said it would do just that.

"We are currently assessing the discrete technical issues raised by the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection related to our application for water quality certification," Williams said in a statement. "We believe that we can be responsive to the issues raised by the agency and intend to resubmit the application to the agency in a timely manner to maintain the customer's in-service date requirement."

It marked the second time in a month that the proposal survived a complete rejection by state regulators in the region. Last month, New York regulators determined the project did not meet their standards, but like this one, their decision was made without prejudice, allowing Williams to reapply.

Williams had planned to spend $926 million on the project, saying it is needed to ensure adequate heating and energy supplies to New York City and Long Island, and that it can be built safely with minimal environmental disruption.

Environmental groups and other opponents say the project would stir up tons of highly polluted sediment and reverse decades of hard-won environmental improvements in Raritan Bay, which has been struggling with pollution.

___

Follow Wayne Parry at http://twitter.com/WayneParryAC

Must Read

China says rebuilding major western Buddhist...

Mar 14, 2017

China says it is rebuilding a major center of Tibetan Buddhist learning in the country's west,...

China plans panda preserve 3 times size of...

Mar 31, 2017

China plans a preserve for giant pandas that will be three times the size of Yellowstone National...

Recent developments surrounding the South China...

Apr 10, 2017

The Pentagon says A U.S. Navy aircraft carrier strike group is departing the South China Sea to...

China, Japan extract combustible ice from seafloor

May 19, 2017

Commercial development of the globe's vast reserves of a frozen fossil fuel known as "combustible...

China's Huawei posts slower first-half revenue...

Jul 27, 2017

China's Huawei Technology says first-half revenues at telecom gear, smartphone businesses expand at...

About Us

RedShiftDaily was started out of fascination with mankind discoveries through peering out into the cosmos. Our team of enthusiasts are going to deliver only the best and latest progress in space technology and discovery so you too can share in the excitement.

Contact us: sales[at]redshiftdaily.com