Silver Butterfly & Hummingbird Jewelry Raising Money for The Nature Conservancy

Zealandia Designs continues a long tradition of raising money for The Nature Conservatory. This year, sales of their butterfly and hummingbird pollinator jewelry from October 3rd to November 3rd

Boise, United States - September 12, 2019 /NewsNetwork/ —

October 3rd is National Butterfly and Hummingbird Day! In celebration of the national holiday, between October 3rd and November 3rd Zealandia Designs will donate 5% of proceeds from sales of designs featuring butterflies and hummingbirds to The Nature Conservancy.

The Nature Conservancy has many programs that protect and educate about important pollinators like butterflies and hummingbirds. This effort to raise funds by Zealandia Designs continues a long company tradition of being a financial supporter of the Nature Conservancy and many other similar charities.

The family-owned business is honored to sponsor an additional charitable opportunity to bring awareness to important environmental causes. The company’s products include sterling silver jewelry and accessories featuring fossilized ivory and semi-precious stones.

Much of Zealandia Design’s jewelry features totemic animal imagery such as sea creatures like turtles and mermaids and pollinators like bees, hummingbirds, and butterflies.

Pollinators are vital to a healthy ecosystem. When discussing pollinators, bees usually get all the attention but they’re not the only ones. Butterflies and hummingbirds are also pollinators, though often overlooked in this category.

By designing and selling butterfly and hummingbird jewelry, Zealandia Designs hopes to help keep the conversation going about all pollinators and why they matter.

Why is pollination important? The pollination process leads to fruit, nuts, and vegetables that are essential to the human diet and environmental ecosystem as well as to the production of seeds that continue the growing cycle.

What do butterflies and hummingbirds have in common? What can you do to help butterflies and hummingbirds? Those interested can find additional information in the company’s blog post here: https://www.zealandia.com/blog/2019/09/03/hummingbirds-butterflies-zealandia/

Zealandia Designs has been designing totemic, nature-inspired jewelry since 1987. Their handcrafted designs feature ancient fossilized ivories, sterling silver, shells, and gemstones.

The company is deeply committed to the ethical use of ancient ivory. The use of fossilized ivory from extinct mammoths is particularly poignant when discussing the plight of endangered animals and threatened habitats. The company’s use of fossilized walrus tusk helps support the indigenous Yupik people of St. Lawrence Island in the Bering Sea.

Those interested in learning about what can be done to help pollinators of all kinds before it’s too late and the world loses these beautiful pollinators can see additional information at the company’s website listed above.

Contact Info:
Name: Lesley Juel
Email: Send Email
Organization: Zealandia Designs
Address: undefined, Boise, ID, United States
Website: https://www.zealandia.com

Source: NewsNetwork

Release ID: 88918164

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